Breast and Cervical Cancer in the Americas: situation and opportunities for action

This study was carried out to better understand the current situation and public health response for breast and cervical cancer, the most common cancers among women in the Americas. Results show that mortality rates from cervical cancer have decreased in the Region, whereas only a few countries are showing a decrease in breast cancer mortality. Public health response capacity for these cancers is in place in the majority of countries, which indicates the potential to further reduce the disease burden from breast and cervical cancer. This study was carried out by HA and the Non Communicable Diseases and Disabilities Unit to better understand the current situation and public health response for breast and cervical cancer, the most common cancers among women in the Americas.
Read more

Mortality from diseases, conditions, and injuries where alcohol was a necessary cause, the Americas (2007-2009)

Mortality from diseases, conditions and injuries where alcohol was a necessary cause was assessed in 16 countries in North and Latin America for the triennium 2007-2009. This analysis, developed by HA and the Mental Health and Substance Use Unit, showed that men accounted for 86% of all deaths and women 14%. This problem is an important cause of premature mortality in the Americas, since the 40-59 years age group represented 53.8% of all deaths. Most deaths were due to liver diseases, followed by neuropsychiatric disorders. Some countries showed high risk of dying from this group of causes, especially in Central America.
Read more

Cardiovascular disease mortality in the Americas: current trends and disparities

The analysis carried out by HA and the Non Communicable Diseases and Disabilities Unit, regarding the analysis of the situation and mortality trends due to Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) in the Americas and its association with economic indicator in selected countries showed that CVD deaths comprised 33.7% of overall deaths in 2007. The risk of CVD mortality was 2.7 times higher in the most affected country compared to the least affected.  Men were at higher risk to die than women in all countries. The decline in CVD mortality rates in the Americas was -3.2% annually for both sexes during the study period. Most countries experienced a decline in their rates, except Guatemala, Guyana, Suriname, Paraguay and Panama. Canada, the USA and Puerto Rico accumulated the largest annual reductions. High income countries had significantly lower CVD mortality rates across the study period compared to countries in upper and lower middle income groups.
Read more

 

Back to Health situation analysis